e-Devlet Ölçümleme: Dünya Ekonomik Forumu (WEF)

WEF e-Devlet Ölçümleme Raporları

The Global Information Technology Report 2016
Innovating in the Digital Economy
“Part 1 of the 2016 edition of The Global Information Technology Report assesses the state of networked readiness of 139 economies using the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) (Chapter 1.1) and, under the theme “Innovating in the Digital Economy,” examines the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in driving innovation (Chapters 1.1 and 1.2). Part 2 consists of an extensive data compendium with the detailed performance of each economy in the NRI (Section 2.1) and rankings for each of the 53 individual indicators included in the NRI (Section 2.2).


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The Global Information Technology Report 2015
ICTs for Inclusive Growth
“Part 1 of the 2015 edition of The Global Information Technology Report assesses the state of networked readiness of 143 economies using the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) (Chapter 1.1) and examines the role of ICTs in supporting inclusive growth through a number of contributions by leading experts and practitioners (Chapters 1.2 through 1.11). Part 2 consists of an extensive data compendium with the detailed performance of each economy in the NRI (Section 2.1) and rankings for each of the 53 individual indicators included in the NRI (Section 2.2).


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The Global Information Technology Report 2014
Rewards and Risks of Big Data
“When The Global Information Technology Report (GITR) and the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) were created more than 13 years ago, the attention of decision makers was focused on how to develop strategies that would allow them to benefit from what Time Magazine had described as “the new economy”: a new way of organizing and managing economic activity based on the new opportunities that the Internet provided for businesses. 1 At present, the world is slowly emerging from one of the worst financial and economic crises in decades, and policymakers, business leaders, and civil society are looking into new opportunities that can consolidate growth, generate new employment, and create business opportunities. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) continue to rank high on the list as one of the key sources of new opportunities to foster innovation and boost economic and social prosperity, for both advanced and emerging economies.


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The Global Information Technology Report 2013
Growth and Jobs in a Hyperconnected World

“When The Global Information Technology Report (GITR) and the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) were created some 12 years ago, the attention of decision makers and investors was on adopting business and financial strategies that would allow them to develop in the context of a fast-moving but nascent Internet economy. Over more than a decade, the NRI has provided decision leaders with a useful conceptual framework to evaluate the impact of information and communications technologies (ICTs) at a global level, and to benchmark the ICT readiness and the usage of their economies. Today, the world has undergone massive changes: the Internet bubble has come and gone, and emerging countries such as China and India have become prominent global users and providers of ICT equipment and services.


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The Global Information Technology Report 2012
Living in a Hyperconnected World
“Last year, the Global Information Technology Report (GITR) series celebrated its 10th anniversary. The World Economic Forum, in collaboration with INSEAD, initially began this project to explore the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on productivity and development as a component of the Forum’s research on competitiveness. To this end, over the past decade the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) has
been measuring the degree to which economies across the world leverage ICT for enhanced competitiveness. During this period, it has been helping policymakers and relevant stakeholders to track their economies’ strengths and weaknesses as well as their progress over time. In addition, it has identified best practices in networked readiness and designed roadmaps and strategies for es-tablishing optimal ICT diffusion to boost competiveness. Since 2002, the networked readiness framework has remained stable, aside from some minor adjustments at the variable level to better reflect the dynamic trends in the technology landscape.


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The Global Information Technology Report 2011
Lessons Learned from around the World
“Governments around the world are faced with new demands, new expectations and a fast-growing array of new technologies and tools. A current example is the Middle East, where a youth revolution built on the global technology revolution is demanding immediate reform. The challenges faced by governments increasingly span national borders and require resources and expertise to be mobilized on a scale that far exceeds those of governments.To be efficient and effective in today’s complex, interlinked and fast-changing environment, governments need to redesign their structures and processes to capitalize on a new set of actors and tools. 


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The Global Information Technology Report 2010
Transformations 2.0
“The Global Information Technology Report series celebrates its 10th anniversary this year. The series has followed and tried to cast light on the evolution of information and communication technologies (ICT) over the last decade, as well as raising awareness about the importance of ICT diffusion and leveraging for increased development, growth, and better living conditions. The methodological framework of the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) has mapped out the enabling factors driving networked readiness, which is the capacity of countries to fully benefit from new technologies in their competitiveness strategies and their citizens’ daily lives. The Index has allowed private and public stakeholders to monitor progress for an ever-increasing number of economies all over the globe, as well as to identify competitive strengths and weaknesses in national networked readiness landscapes.


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The Global Information Technology Report 2009
ICT for Sustainability
“The Global Information Technology Report 2009–2010 appears at a rosier time in economic history than last year’s edition, when the world seemed to be plunging into a major recession. Encouraging signs of recovery
have appeared in early 2010 in many countries across the world, spearheaded by emerging markets such as China and India, which achieved healthy GDP growth rates in 2009. Information and communication technologies (ICT) is an ever-important enabler of renewed and sustainable growth in such a context. Its unique function as a key element of infrastructure for efficient industries and a critical productivity enhancer is crucial for sustaining recovery and laying the foundations for economies that are competitive in the long term.


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The Global Information Technology Report 2008
Mobility in a Networked World
“Information and communication technologies (ICT) has proven to be a key enabler of socioeconomic progress and development, enhancing productivity and therefore economic growth, reducing poverty and improving living standards in many ways. ICT is increasingly revolutionizing production processes, access to markets, and information sources together with social interactions. ICT also has an impact on government efficiency, fostering transparency and better communication and services with and to citizens.
Among these new technologies, mobile telephony takes a special place in view of its exceptional diffusion in the last decade or so and its strong social and economic impact


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The Global Information Technology Report 2007
“The world is becoming more networked with the passing of each day. Not only are the number of interconnections amongst individuals, businesses, and governments increasing, but there is also increased recognition of
connectivity as a key component of public infrastructure in general. 1 New definitions portray high bandwidth connectivity as a necessity, perhaps even a public utility on the order of drinking water. For instance, the Chicago Digital Access Alliance has promoted the notion of  universal broadband access as a public right. 2 Similar statements by the European Commission present high bandwidth connectivity as a service of general economic interest. 3 Providers have also jumped on the bandwagon of broadband as a “universal service.” For example, in October 2007, the UK Post Office launched a new service specifically designed to attract late adopters of broadband services.


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The Global Information Technology Report 2006
 


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The Global Information Technology Report 2005


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HIZLI ERİŞİM

2016: The Global Information Technology Report 2016 – Innovating in the Digital Economy

2015: The Global Information Technology Report 2015 – ICTs for Inclusive Growth

2014: The Global Information Technology Report 2014 – Rewards and Risks of Big Data

2013: The Global Information Technology Report 2013 – Growth and Jobs in a Hyperconnected World

2012: The Global Information Technology Report 2012 – Living in a Hyperconnected World

2011: The Global Information Technology Report 2011 – Lessons Learned from around the World

2010: The Global Information Technology Report 2010 – Transformations 2.0

2009: The Global Information Technology Report 2009 – ICT for Sustainability

2008: The Global Information Technology Report 2008 – Mobility in a Networked World

2007: The Global Information Technology Report 2007